Recipe: Espresso Marinated Flank Steak

This recipe for Espresso Marinated Flank Steak with Plantain Chutney, developed by Juan Montalvo, looks scrumptious and we can’t wait to try it!

Flank Steak
2 pounds flank steak
1 cup espresso
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 cup honey
1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
6 garlic cloves, minced
2 tbsp. black peppercorn, crushed

Whisk espresso, vinegar, olive oil, honey, Worcestershire sauce, garlic
and peppercorn in bowl. Place flank steak in a resealable plastic bag
and pour marinade into bag. Remove all the air from bag and
refrigerate for minimum 1 hour.

Remove steak from marinade. Place steak on medium high heat grill
and cook for 4-5 minutes per side. Transfer steak to cutting board and
let rest for 5-10 minutes before cutting. Slice thinly across the grain.

Plantain Chutney
3 ripe plantains (they should be yellow with black spots on the outside)
1 medium onion, diced
1 Jalapeno, seeded and minced
2 tbsp. honey
1/2 cup chicken stock
1 tbsp. olive oil

Spray baking dish with cooking spray. Peel plantain and place on
baking dish. Bake in a preheated 375F oven until well browned. Once
cooked, place plantain aside to cool. Cut plantain lengthwise and dice.

Pour olive oil into a medium heat sauce pan. Add onions and cook
until translucent. Add plantain, jalapeno, chicken stock, and honey,
salt and pepper to taste, cook for 5-10 minutes to warm all ingredients
together. Pour over the top of the sliced flank steak.

Makes 6 Servings

Looking Lean on the Beans

Coffee Cherry PlantWe wrote recently about the environmental factors in India that may reduce that country’s crop harvest this season, and it’s looking like the current economic influences are making it hard for Brazilian farmers to get the loans required to fertilize and harvest their entire plantations.

What does this mean for us? Well, annual consumption of coffee beans per year is around 130 million pounds, but production is now estimated at around 122 million pounds of beans for the next harvest season, leaving us with a possible 8 million pound shortfall.

Your Daily Coffee, Courtesy of HAL

Maybe we’ve painted ourselves into a corner with the whole time-is-of-the-essence ideology that seems to influence our focus on developing new and improved gadgets that will save us time, but one thing’s for sure: We can’t stop now.

Enter a Windows XP powered coffee maker that will allow you to program your favorite coffee, access it over the Internet and initiate the brew so you can walk right into the kitchen and pick it up. It’s almost worthy of the Jetson’s…but, unfortunately, it’s just a home modification at this point. At least we know it can be done — and that’s half the battle, right?

4…3…2…1…Pulling Delicious Shots with the La Pavoni

People often think that La Pavoni’s manual lever espresso machines are overly complex throwbacks created just for hardcore purists, but they’re actually relatively easy machines to use — and they make amazing espresso!

In this video, watch Gail use the La Pavoni for the first time, experimenting with different grind levels in order to get a great shot.

Hot Blog on Blog Action: Man Seeking Coffee

Written by a mild caffeine addict whose only qualifications are a passion for coffee and tons of wasted money on experiencing bad coffee, Man Seeking Coffee is a blog for lovers of the bean who are looking for tips, corroboration or debate.

The San Francisco-based writer has even come up with a rating system for beans so that you’ll come to understand his perspective on a truly quantitative level, but also talks about cafes and coffee culture…you know, just to round it out. Enjoy the read!

Ed. Note: The Man Seeking Coffee blog is currently on hiatus. You may want to try A Table in the Corner of the Cafe blog instead.

Cherry-Picked with Love

A thousand feet up in the hills behind Kona on the Big Island of Hawaii, Jim and Sharon Skibby grow top-notch coffee. Theirs is a small-scale operation, a labor of love. From 75 trees they harvest about 700 pounds of cherries (coffee fruits) — enough to make 100 pounds of finished coffee.

Read all about how this pair of boutique coffee farmers harvest and process their beans each year — quite interesting!