Category Archives: Velton’s Coffee

Brewin’ with Brandi: Twilight Dark Chocolate Truffles

Around these parts, we can’t just settle for truffles. They need to be dark Velton Twilight Coffeechocolate truffles. But are those good enough? Nope. They also need coffee. Not any kind of coffee, though. It needs to be Velton’s Twilight coffee. Wow, we’re picky!

The result of all this pickiness, however, are some amazingly delicious food items. So, without further ado, we present to you Twilight Dark Chocolate Truffles!

 

Ingredients

  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 2 tbsp ground Velton’s Twilight coffee
  • 4 oz baker’s chocolate
  • 2 3/4 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips

Directions

  • Add all ingredients to a sauce pan and heat over medium until all ingredients are melted (about 10 minutes), stirring constantly.
  • When all ingredients are melted and the mixture is smooth, pour into a glass bowl and refrigerate for one hour or until it is a firm consistency.
  • Remove the bowl from the refrigerator and scoop the mixture onto wax paper or into treat cups by the tablespoon. Hint: A cookie scoop is great for this!
  • Serve immediately or refrigerate until ready to serve.

Brewin’ with Brandi: Espresso Whipped Cream

Espresso Whipped Cream RecipeSometimes, simple is better; but other times, souping up simple is even better. Take this espresso whipped cream recipe, for example: With the minor addition of finely ground coffee to a fairly standard whipped cream recipe, you produce something that is altogether more sophisticated and refined.

This delectable topping could proudly accent a gourmet coffee brew or molten chocolate cake; heck, it could even stand on its own, chilled in a decorative serving glass. And if you don’t have Brandi’s rockin’ biceps to work it out with a standard whisk, you can whip it up using an electronic mixer when you’re not even in the room! What could be more simple?

Watch her show us how it’s done in this fun recipe how-to video.

Recipe: Espresso Whipped Cream

Ingredients

  • 1 cup chilled whipping cream
  • 3 tablespoons golden brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon finely ground coffee – we used Velton’s Twilight

Directions

In a medium bowl, beat all the ingredients until it forms soft peaks. Can be prepared up to 4 hours in advance and stored covered in the refrigerator if needed.

Source

Brewin’ with Brandi: Coffee Fruitcake

Coffee Fruitcake RecipeThere are a few different theories on why fruitcakes in the US have become a point of humor and derision. Some equate their density to a doorstop, others find their sometimes-odd assortment of dried fruits to be cloyingly sweet. But not all fruitcake recipes should be given such short shrift! Brandi’s coffee fruitcake, for example, infuses a fairly standard cake batter with delicious java and simple dried currents. The key is to bake it low and slow, producing a dense and delectable dessert that would only be made more delicious by an accompaniment of even more coffee … of course.

Watch as she crafts this cake at the direction of a heckling camerawoman!

Recipe: Coffee Fruitcake

Ingredients

  • 1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 stick of unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 cup packed light brown sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/2 cup molasses (not robust or blackstrap)
  • 1/2 cup strong coffee — at room temperature
  • 1 box dried currants

Directions

  1. Put the oven rack in the middle position and pre-heat the oven to 250F. Prepare loaf pan by lightly greasing with butter or oil.
  2. In a large bowl, sift together flour, cinnamon, salt, cloves, nutmeg and baking soda.
  3. In another large bowl, beat butter an sugar together until light and fluffy.
  4. Add the eggs and molasses to the butter and sugar, then incorporate well.
  5. Add the coffee and beat until well-blended.
  6. Slowly add the dry ingredients and beat until smooth.
  7. Fold the dried fruit into the batter.
  8. Fill the loaf pans and then bake for about 2 3/4 hours, until a skewer comes out cleanly. Your cake may sink slightly in the center after cooling.

Brewin’ with Brandi: Easy Tiramisu Recipe

Easy Tiramisu RecipeThere are some things in life that just shouldn’t be easy — becoming a doctor, developing muscle tone, writing the Great American Novel — these are all processes that have a defined pace which likely contributes to their very worth. You must walk before you run, try to notice the foliage along the way and no doubt be better for having followed a more disciplined approach to the endeavor. In that vein, we submit another activity that may not be the best when rendered ‘easy': Tiramisu. Yes, it still tastes great and everyone you know will be clamoring for more, but is it really a good idea that you’re able to whip up such a devilishly delicious dessert so quickly and easily?

As Brandi demonstrates in this video, except for the whipping of the cream, this tiramisu recipe is probably too simple to keep anyone very honest and on track with dietary balance. Gail even joins her in the end to sample this delectable treat … and pretty much everything used to make it. If you’re looking for a super simple, easy and crowd-pleasing dessert for this holiday season (or any other time of the year, really,) then this tiramisu is the choice for you.

Recipe: Easy Tiramisu

Ingredients

  • 1 frozen pound cake (10 3/4 oz), thawed
  • 3/4 cup strongly brewed coffee (you know we used Velton’s Twilight!)
  • 8 oz cream cheese
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup Monin Dark Chocolate sauce
  • 1 cup heavy cream, whipped
  • 2 Heath bars, crushed

Directions

  1. Slice the pound cake into nine slices and arrange in an ungraded 11 x 7 baking dish.
  2. Drizzle the pound cake with the coffee.
  3. In a bowl, beat the cream cheese and sugar until smooth.
  4. Add the chocolate syrup, blend well.
  5. Fold in the whipped cream until well incorporated.
  6. Spread the mixture over the pound cake, then sprinkle with the crushed candy.
  7. Refrigerate until serving.
  8. Give up all hope of losing that last 5 pounds.

Source

Scary French Press Experiments for Halloween

experimentWith (seemingly) unlimited access to great coffee and espresso making equipment comes great responsibility. In this spirit, Seattle Coffee Gear tests out the things we hear on the gear we have, mainly so you don’t have to … Sure, we made eggs with an espresso machine steam wand.  What more? This week, the interwebs inspired us to try three more truly crazy coffee experiments. Insert mad (coffee) scientist laughter here [muah hahaha]!!!

Coffee and Beer

This is a natural partnership in the beverage world. If you enjoy beer and coffee, there are plenty of coffee porters and espresso stouts available in specialty shops. But what if you want beer-flavor coffee instead of coffee-flavored beer? This question occurred to our Instagram friend one morning when he combined Young’s Double Chocolate Stout with Starbucks Pike Place medium roast and Bailey’s hazelnut coffee creamer in a mug. Sadly, he did not find the combination delicious. So we picked up where young Mister Alves left off … oh yeah, we brewed a French press with boiling beer instead of boiling water.

The recipe: French press, 32oz Midnight Sun Brewing Co. Arctic Rhino Coffee Porter heated almost to boil (at boiling it goes to a huge fizzy mess so monitor the situation carefully if you try this at home and use a saucepan that will hold double your initial volume for safety sake and, heck, while you’re at it put on some Kareem Abdul Jabbar-style safety goggles) and 62 grams Velton’s Twilight blend coffee. 4 minute steep, then plunge.

The results: It tasted like warm beer, the coffee essence was not pronounced. Bummer.

Coffee and Coconut Water

If it looks like water will it perform like water? This was the rationale behind our next experiment. In truth we thought we had a fair chance that this would turn out to be a taste sensation. Some folks have experimented with heated milk or soy milk as a water substitute also but in all cases the flavor did not extract well because the proteins and sugars get in the way.

The recipe: French press, plus we gurgled a 32oz carton of Vita Coco coconut water into a saucepan and brought it to a boil. Then we added 62 grams Velton’s Twilight blend coffee. 4 minute steep, then plunge.

The results: When refrigerated, coconut water doesn’t have a very distinctive taste, but heated, regrettably, it turned very sweet. The coffee flavor was barely there, it was as if someone had spilled the whole sugar bowl into a single cup of coffee.

Coffee and Chicken Broth

Ripped from the headlines! The single cup coffee brewer market is being taken by storm and by chicken noodle soup capsules. I took an informal survey of friends and family members who admitted to owning Keurigs, and my suspicions were confirmed: Not one of them had ever cleaned or descaled their little dudes. Why does their coffee taste bad? Many reasons, and now chicken soup is one. So to drive home the point that it doesn’t matter how you make your coffee, you have to keep your equipment clean, I made a French press with boiling chicken stock instead of boiling water.

The recipe: French press, 32oz Pacific Natural Foods Organic Free Range Chicken Broth heated to a simmer, 62 grams Velton’s Twilight blend coffee. 4 minute steep, then plunge.

The results: This approach was too concentrated. The chicken flavor predominated the combination and it was so strong it was hard to try even one sip. Gross!

Conclusion

After three failed experiments in a row, did I give up? No! In a stroke of genius inspired by too many episodes of the televised cooking contest Chopped, I combined all three results into one carafe. Surprisingly, this created a very wacky yet drinkable cup. In fact, it may already be invented and available for sale in an international vending machine somewhere. If it is not, feel free to pitch the idea yourself — now you have the recipe!

PS. Because Bunny would kill me if I wasted all of that nice Velton’s Coffee, I browned some ground pork, added some beans and New Mexico green chile and made a delicious chili con carne for dinner.

coffee beer chili with coconut water and chicken broth

Crew Review: AeroPress – Redux!

AeroPressIf you were to survey the crew at SCG about their favorite coffee prep, you’d learn that the AeroPress is the hands-down winner. We love how simple and easy it is to use, plus it’s compact, transportable and produces a delicious cup of coffee.

Over the years, we’ve featured it in a variety of videos, but hadn’t actually refreshed our original crew review of it, even though it was updated a bit in the interim by Aerobie. So we asked its biggest fan, Bunny!!!, to give us the rundown — how it works, what it comes with, etc. — in this updated review. Watch her show off its components and accessories, then prepare coffee using two different methods: That described by Aerobie and the very popular inverted technique.

Whether you’re camping, hiking, out on the road or just hanging out at home, the AeroPress is an excellent choice in coffee accoutrement. Pair it with the Hario Mini Mill and you’ve got an awesome java prep no matter where the day takes you.

Crew Review: AeroPress – Redux!

Hot Blog on Blog Action: Tea Time — What?!

velton rossLast month something strange happened at Seattle Coffee Gear (well, stranger than usual): A bunch of the SCG Crew started drinking *gasp* tea! And with this new found appreciation for tea, we discovered the basic preparation fundamentals are similar to coffee prep.  It starts with fresh water, a quality product and the right gear. Check out the lovely links you may have missed about all things coffee (and tea!).

  • Here Is My Handle, Here Is My Spout via 39Steeps.blogspot.com – Don’t settle for a drippy tea kettle when you can harness the power of fluid dynamics, no lab glasses or Bunsen burners required!
  • Interview: Coffee Pro Velton Ross via FoodGPS.com – Our ace reporter Brenna tracks Velton’s success from barista to renown roaster.
  • The Controversy Over Crema via TheShot.CoffeeRatings.com – Shocking but true stories about espresso crema. Some people scoop it off! Some people have been known to mix it altogether! And some naughty people call blonding from a pressurized portafilter, crema.
  • The Art of Making Flowering Tea via LeafJoy.com – Grab a glass teacup or glass teapot and watch the magic unfold. Flowering teas are more fascinating to watch than Sea-Monkeys and more enjoyable to consume (we’re just theorizing here, though, because we’ve never consumed Sea-Monkeys).
  • Be A Coffee Pro At Home: Vertical Tastings via ChicagoCoffeeScene.com – Take the best whole beans you can find and then do a little side-by-side challenge with your favorite coffee preps. AeroPress, Chemex, French press … it’s all good!

If you want a daily dose, we spill the beans about serving espresso in brandy snifters, the Kaffeologie S-Filter upgrade and other items of caffeinated interest on:

Vertical Coffee Tasting: Velton’s Brazil Condado Estate

Velton's Coffee - Single OriginsOne of the benefits of choosing a single origin bean is consistency. Especially when pulling shots of espresso where you’re utilizing a relatively small amount of coffee grounds in your brew, a single origin ensures you’re getting the same grinds every time. With a blend, on the other hand, you have the potential for a unknown ratio to end up in your portafilter, and that can cause a little bit of havoc if you have a deep commitment to consistency.

One of the drawbacks, however, is that single origins can be difficult to source. While a blend is devised with a target flavor profile in mind and the sourcing and selection of beans will change every year depending on the coffee crop, a single origin is, well, a single coffee bean. If you fall in love with one from a specific estate or farm and they experience issues the following year, you’re kind of out of luck. But maybe that’s also something you can love about them — the potential for their rarity.

In this video, we play around with a few different preparations of a single origin from Velton’s Coffee, the Brazil Condado Estate. We featured this guy because it is a great espresso single origin and also produces a delicious cup via pour over, AeroPress and drip. Watch the ladies prep it up and give their thoughts on the coffee’s flavor profile.