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Crew Review: Saeco Energica Superautomatic Espresso Machine

Espressos, cappuccinos and lattes – oh my! The Saeco Energica is quite the energetic saeco-energicasuperautomatic. Why are we so thrilled about this energizing machine? We’re glad you asked…

The latest Certified Refurbished machine to release from Saeco, we like to think we’re reuniting the Energica with its long lost Exprelia family – you see the resemblance too, right? Featuring large, programmable one-touch buttons, a convenient auto milk frothing container and removable hot water spout, we dare you to find something this machine can’t do! Did we also mention the Energica has a bypass doser for your favorite pre-ground blend?

If all of these features leave you curious for more – and we know it does, don’t miss Gail’s latest review of this super-de-duper automatic machine!

Commercial Customer Spotlight: The Seed

Did you know that we have a department dedicated to helping coffee shops, and other commercial caffeine-serving institutions, get the perfect setup? Just as we’re super passionate about helping people make a great cup of coffee at home, we also want to help baristas make a great cup of coffee for you while you’re out and about!

The SeedOver the years, we’ve worked with a variety of commercial customers, from cafes to banks and restaurants to schools. Each one of them has two things in common: They have a vision of their dream setup and they have very distinct needs (be it throughput, available space or even the color of the machine that will pull the whole space together). So, we’re super excited to begin a series of spotlights on some of these businesses that we hope will help you feel more confident when making your purchasing decisions and maybe even provide some inspiration!

The Seed, a coffee and juice bar, was gracious enough to be our first participant (thank you, Rachel!). So, without further ado, we present their Commercial Customer Spotlight!

Tell us a bit about your operation.

The Seed is a third wave coffee and juice bar in Boca Raton, Florida. We provide an artisan experience with an in-house roaster, pour over bar, espresso service, and small batch juices.

What equipment did you choose and why?

The Seed La MarzoccoWe built our shop around the La Marzocco GB/5. We knew this machine would be the centerpiece of the shop with a custom matte black powder coat. From there, we moved on to find the best grinders for our espresso and selected two Mahlkonig K30 Airs. For our slow bar, we went with the triple threat of Chemex, Hario V60 and Aeropress. These methods are ground to specific parameters on Baratza Forte grinders and the water comes from a Curtis tank. For our classic batch brew, we pair a Curtis grinder with a Bunn brewer.

A huge factor in our selection was the knowledge of the SCG team. Jason was quick to give us all the good and bad which allowed us to make the very best educated decisions for our shop.

What was your experience when you purchased from Seattle Coffee Gear?The Seed - Mugs

Several internet searches pointed us to SCG. The customer service and endless conversations from the SCG sales team, specifically our point person, Jason, were more than we could have hoped for. We would highly recommend the team at SCG and intend to have a long standing relationship for all our coffee gear needs.

What’s in store for the future of your company?
We’re hoping to open several similar operations in the next 2-5 years.

Any tips or tricks you’d like to share with those that are new to the coffee-serving community?

Trust that the common factor must be great coffee and great people. In order to yield the very best coffees, your equipment must be on point. Do not settle for subpar equipment. Your espresso machine and your grinders are EVERYTHING!


We’re really excited to see what the future holds for The Seed, which is already off to an awesome start! You should also totally check out their Facebook page because they seem like a pretty happenin’ place!

Interested in downloading a PDF of their spotlight? Get it here!

Brewin’ with Brandi: Coffee Ice Cream in a Baggie

Let us just start off by saying that we realize there are more efficient ways to make ice cream.

Shaking It Up!

However, we believe this way may be the best. Why? Well, there are three things we really love about this recipe:

  • The ice cream is amazing
  • It’s a workout…seriously
  • Did we mention that the ice cream is amazing?

Plus, it really is (as Kaylie repeats over and over again) a science project. The freezing point of the ice is lowered when you add salt to the bag, meaning that the ice must absorb even more energy (heat!) from the ingredients than it would normally need to in order to melt. The more energy that’s absorbed from the ingredients, the colder the ingredients get and *voila!* ice cream is made.

So, yeah, don’t feel too bad about having your children shake you up a delicious ice cream treat. It’s a little like continuing their education through the summer months (or evenings or weekends…), yes?

Oh, and there will be water everywhere, so do this outside or in an uncarpeted area.

 

Ingredients

  • Ice
  • 1 cup rock salt
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • ½ shot of coffee concentrate (me made ours on the Toddy!)
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream

Other Items

  • Gallon ziplock bag
  • Quart ziplock bag

Directions

  • Add ice to the gallon-sized bag until it is a little more than halfway full.
  • Pour the rock salt onto the ice and shake to mix.
  • In the quart-sized bag, add the sugar, coffee concentrate and heavy whipping cream. Mix lightly and then seal tightly, leaving a little bit of air in the bag.
  • Place the quart-sized bag into the bag filled with ice and seal.
  • Shake and shake and shake some more. Your muscles will burn like they’ve never burned before, but push through it! Shake for five minutes and then check the ice cream for consistency.
  • If the ice cream is still a bit too much on the liquid side, keep shaking. If it’s mostly solidified (remember, it won’t be frozen solid, it will just be more solid), then you’re good to go.
  • Remove the ice cream from its ice and salt bath, wipe off the bag and then eat it up!

Brewin’ with Brandi: Winter Kiss Martini Recipe

Winter Kiss Martini RecipeIt’s a brand new year and that deserves a little celebration, no? If you didn’t get all of your festivities out of your system a couple of nights ago, or you’re someone who feels that every day should end with a little bit of celebration, then this martini recipe has you in mind.

Admittedly, we weren’t sure about the fruit-and-mint combination that is featured in this martini, but it turned out to be both very refreshing and a little bit sweet. So break out the booze and the cocktail shaker, grab a bottle of your Monin Frosted Mint and get to shakin’! Or, just sit back and watch Brandi do all the work, then live vicariously through her enjoyment of this lovely martini.

Winter Kiss Martini Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz. Monin Frosted Mint syrup
  • 1 1/4 oz. berry-flavored vodka
  • 1/2 oz. orange cognac
  • 2 oz. cranberry juice
  • ice
  • orange peel (for garnish)

Directions

In a cocktail shaker, combine all ingredients and then shake well. Serve up in a martini glass and garnish with an orange peel.

What’s Your Signature Espresso Drink? Episode Two: The Puristas

Purista Blog - Coffee RoasterWe talk a lot about coffee experimentation here at SCG. The great thing about being a coffee lover is that there is always something new to learn. Heck, we will try any espresso drink and any coffee brewing method at least once and we love to share our knowledge.

Recently, we met a couple who have taken our raison d’être ’How do you make great coffee at home?’ to new heights of exploration. They have even started to roast their own coffee beans at home! When passion and inquisitive minds collide … meet the bloggers behind Purista.

Home Roasters

David and Mae have a beautiful coffee review blog. In researching their coffee reviews they found ‘one green coffee can become any multitude of different roasts.’ Many coffee lovers would simply compare these final roasts but David and Mae were intrigued by the whole process. ‘In order to more fully explore coffee, and to provide ourselves with even more education and understanding, we decided to begin roasting coffee at home. We are still in the early stages of our roasting setup, and are learning new things with every roast.’

Ethiopia Aramo

David and Mae’s Recipe for Success

‘We recently adopted a back-to-basics mentality with our roasting. Per the suggestion of a member of the Sweet Maria’s coffee roasting community, we now roast in the following manner:

  • Turn on the roaster
  • Add just enough coffee to stop the rotation of the mass of coffee
  • Watch. Smell. Listen.

This has already proven so much better than how we were doing it before. Our roasts are now closer to seven minutes, rather than the four minutes we were getting before for the same roast level. This translates to a more developed profile — more complex aromas, flavors, finish.’

Signature Drink: Pomegranate Molasses Affogato

Here is the background and step by step recipe with pictures from David and Mae for this luscious and festive holiday treat. The volume yields 4 drinks total.

‘We wanted to create a signature drink that embodies the season, but keeps our Purista ideals in tact. What we mean by that is that we want the coffee to be the focal point and any additions secondary and complementary. Since we’re also proponents for taking the time to make something well, the recipe involves a bit of work.
Pomegranate Molasses Affogato

Ingredients

  • 1 pint Vanilla ice cream; chocolate ice cream would be a solid choice as well
  • 4 double shots Espresso
  • 8 oz 100% Pomegranate juice (POM makes a bottle just the right size)
  • 1 tbsp Agave sweetener (you can use cane sugar or honey instead)

Directions

We’ll walk you through the pomegranate molasses reduction before the assembly of the drinks. This takes some time, and attentiveness, but you can make it ahead of time and store it in a container in the refrigerator for up to two weeks.

  1. In a small saucepan, combine the pomegranate juice and agave sweetener and reduce on a medium-low heat. The liquid should simmer within about ten minutes. After ten minutes check it about every four minutes. In twenty eight to thirty minutes, the liquid should have reduced by more than half and coat a spoon ever so slightly, like syrup, when stirred. Don’t let it get too thick, as it will thicken a bit more as it cools, and for this drink we want it to be about the same consistency as the espresso.
  2. Remove from heat and let it cool about five minutes before pouring it into a suitable container. If you’re doing it ahead of time you can just put it in the refrigerator. If you need to use it relatively soon, pop it in the freezer for a few minutes.

And now it’s time for assembly …

Pomegranate Molasses Affogato

  1. Place 1/2 cup ice cream into 4 small cups or bowls. For reference, our INKER cups are 6 ounces. Place in the freezer until the espresso is prepared.
  2. Pull a double shot of espresso for each serving.
  3. Take the ice cream out of the freezer and pour a fresh double shot over each serving, followed by a tablespoon of pomegranate molasses.

Note the way that the syrup and espresso seamlessly blend together in texture. Then take note of the tartly sweet play on the coffee’s own acidity accentuated and complemented by the pomegranate. The ice cream is just a carrier vessel, and a balancing component that tames the intense flavors just enough, and shocks the coffee into a submissive temperature. This is our treat of the season, and since we can’t have you in our own living room, we send this decadence off to yours. Happy holidays!’

Many thanks to David and Mae. If you would like to share the recipe for your signature drink, send us an email!

The Reluctant Barista: What’s Up With Portafilters?

Saeco Via Venezia portafilter optionsFrom bean to cup, making espresso at home is poetry in motion. Nothing captures the essence of espresso better than a close up view of a streaming bottomless portafilter — a portafilter designed without spouts so that the bottom of the filter basket is visible. Bottomless, pressurized, non-pressurized … though they do the same job, they each do it a little differently. To get the most out of any espresso machine, let’s get to know the portafilter a little better.

First off, what exactly is a portafilter? Some people call just the handle portion portafilter and some people call the handle and filter basket combination portafilter. Some people also call it a portaholder, and that is a little weird, but we understand what you mean. Once the filter basket is filled with ground coffee, the portafilter can be locked into place inside the brew head of your traditional espresso machine. Locked and loaded! Now you are ready to pull espresso shots … If it were only that easy!

To illustrate the differences between types of portafilters, I chose the Saeco Via Venezia. It is a semi-automatic home espresso machine that comes with a pressurized portafilter. There is also a non-pressurized portafilter and bottomless portafilter upgrade available for it, so it makes a good example of how each portafilter works to create a different espresso experience. All three portafilters use the original included double filter basket. Here’s how they compare:

Saeco Via Venezia pressurized portafilterPressurized – The espresso flow is greatly restricted. When the pressure from the boiler combines with an added restriction, it literally spits the coffee out. The restrictive design can be part of the filter basket, part of the portafilter (the Via Venezia uses an additional gasket) or a spring between these two pieces.

Pressurized portafilters often come standard on entry-level espresso machines because they are easier to use for beginners. The coffee doesn’t have to be perfectly fresh, the size of the grind can have a little bit more variation and tamping is not necessary in most cases.

In exchange for this ease of use, the cleanup is messier because the leftover puck is wetter. It is hard to explain the taste difference but a pressurized shot will taste a little bland and homogenous when compared with a non-pressurized espresso shot. The crema produced is mainly a function of extra pressure and not an indicator of coffee freshness. It adds to the visual appeal but not the taste. However, if you are making milk-based drinks you will probably not notice these small differences.

Saeco Via Venezia non-pressurized portafilter upgradeNon-Pressurized – The 15 bar pressure from an espresso machine forces the water and steam through the filter basket. A good espresso extraction needs freshly ground coffee with a consistent particle size. It is also important to tamp evenly with the right amount of pressure so that water flows through in a uniform manner. If espresso flows out one side more than the other, it will still taste okay, but it might have had the potential to taste better with a more even tamp, or a more accurate dosage, or more consistently ground coffee. This is the point where you can seriously start to geek out about your espresso-making methodology!

Non-Pressurized portafilters are for home baristas ready for the challenge to manage variables manually. If you have an interest in crafting delicious espresso, you need a non-pressurized portafilter. This is especially true if you drink espresso, Americano coffee or a Cafe Macchiato. These are drinks where the character of the espresso is front and center compared to a latte or cappuccino where the espresso takes a backseat to ten ounces of milky goodness.

Bottomless – (Sometimes called a naked portafilter.) Usually, the spouts on the bottom of the portafilter direct the coffee as it streams out. Not so with a bottomless portafilter. As a learning tool for a home barista, the bottomless portafilter is a great way to check your progress. Saeco Via Venezia bottomless portafilterThe term ‘channeling’ refers to water that leaks through the puck unevenly due to poor distribution of grounds. Other reasons these crevasses occur can be due to an inconsistent grind, incorrect dosage or an uneven tamp. Any small error will result in random spurts and a messy espresso extraction with a bottomless portafilter. The barista can then take steps to fix one or more of these variables in the hopes of producing a cleaner (and better tasting!) shot.

Some say a bottomless portafilter will make a hotter shot since the espresso does not come into contact with a metal spout. This temperature difference is pretty negligible. It is easier to brew directly into a demitasse and it is easier to keep clean. But the main reason to use a bottomless portafilter is the visual cues it offers that can lead you to micro adjustments in timing, tamping and measurement.

About Filter Baskets – An E61 filter basket is 58mm across while the Via Venezia filter basket is 53mm across and DeLonghi tends to run about 51mm across. Sizes, shapes and hole patterns vary by manufacturer. There is no consensus on whether bigger is better or which proprietary hole pattern is better. The often frustrating thing for home baristas to keep in mind is that most portafilters and filter baskets are not interchangeable between brands. Even if they share the same size diameter, their profile shape will prevent a universal fit in the portafilter or brew head configuration of a different model espresso machine. When looking for a replacement or upgrade, double check compatibility first!

Along with the functional differences listed above, some portafilters are heavier, some are lighter weight and some may feel more balanced in your hand. The tactile sensation of the portafilter is important too. Will the portafilter be ergonomic for all household users? These are seemingly small details to consider when evaluating an espresso machine purchase but it will be part of your daily routine for years to come, so it’s best to shake hands and get to know your portafilter first!

Crew Review: Jura Impressa F7

Jura Impressa F7In the recent evolutions of Jura’s long line of sophisticated superautomatic espresso machines, they’ve been focusing on the one-touch cappuccino experience. If you’re someone who doesn’t drink milk-based drinks very often but would like the ability to share those with friends and family when they come over, the new Impressa F7 is well worth your consideration.

Not a traditional one-touch cappuccino crafter, the F7 is two steps: First, you make your shot, then you add your milk (or vice versa, depending on your tastes). Both of them will come out of the same dispenser, however, so you don’t have to move the cup around like on previous versions. It also features their intuitive menu within which you can set dosage and temperature of your shots, even the volume if you know precisely what you’d like. But then you can program it on the fly as drinks are being produced, so if you’re someone who likes to eyeball your coffee (like us!) then you can do that, too.

In his inaugural SCG video, our regional store manager, Chris, shows off the F7 to us. He’s a huge fan of Jura machines in general, but that doesn’t stop him from still giving us (and you) the straight dope on the good, the bad and the particularly gorgeous. Check it out!

Crew Review: Jura Impressa F7

The Reluctant Barista: How to Choose an Espresso Machine

As luck would have it, six years ago this holiday season I was gifted with an entry-level semi-automatic Breville espresso machine. This meant I did not have to select my own home espresso machine or, as Kat likes to call the process, Choose Your Own Adventure. My little dude is still chugging along with its tiny thermoblock and I am both excited and dreading the day I need to pick out the replacement.

Are you in the same boat? The number of manufacturers, models and variations on variations of home espresso machines can be overwhelming. Pour a cup of coffee, sit back and let’s ponder a few questions to set you on the right path for a successful adventure in espresso. This is an exercise in narrowing down available options until you are left with a manageable few to consider. Set aside budget (for the moment) and let’s think about who will use the espresso machine:

Do you have an interest in hand-crafting espresso?

Yes, I want to learn to make drinks myself No, I just want to drink espresso beverages
A semi-automatic espresso machine allows you to decide the dosage and the shot time which you can adjust to enhance the extraction of different styles of coffee. You have the time, counter space and additional equipment (grinder, tools, etc) to do-it-yourself. A superautomatic espresso machine makes life easier. There is less customization possible but shot consistency makes up for it. You will save time, space and possibly budget by having an all-in-one home espresso machine.

Alrighty then! How you approach espresso lands you squarely into one of these two distinct camps: Semi-automatic or superautomatic. Intuitively, this was the easiest espresso question to answer. If only there was a Harry Potter-style Sorting Hat to then announce the right machine for you! Instead, I will separate these two categories by their functionality and you can sort yourself.

Semi-Automatic Espresso Machines

So you want to hand-craft your espresso beverages, eh? Now it’s time to consider what style of semi-automatic might best fit your needs.

Do you drink milk-based espressos (like lattes, cappuccinos etc)?

Yes, Two words…Latte Art No, I like espresso and Americanos
Single boiler home espresso machines can froth milk. A heat exchanger or a dual boiler will get the job done better and faster, but they can cost more due to more complicated internal systems. Even though you won’t need the steam wand to froth milk, you may use it to add hot water to an Americano so make sure it is easily accessible for how you will use the machine. Some machines even have a hot water spigot separate from the steam wand.

Will you invest in a quality burr grinder?

Yes, a good espresso grinder is just as important as the espresso machine Maybe, I’m not sure No, I might use espresso pods, pre-ground espresso and/or a pressurized portafilter
The grinder may cost almost as much as the espresso machine you select. A well designed and well built grinder will offer consistent and uniform particle size necessary for a great shot of espresso. If you are on the fence about it, consider a semi-auto espresso machine with a built-in grinder for the best of both worlds. This will limit your selection to models that can be adapted for espresso pods or compatible with a pressurized portafilter. You will still get to make your own drinks and these options will make it easier for beginners or those pressed for time.

Recommended Semi-Automatic Machines

Based on your answers to the above questions, here are a few different suggestions for you to start your machine research.

Nuova Simonelli Oscar home espresso machine
Bryan uses the red Nuova Simonelli Oscar heat exchanger espresso machine that I want

Semi-Automatic, with a latte focus and a good grinder

This is where I am now. I have a Baratza grinder and I am ready to find a semi-auto with excellent shots and very good frothing capability. Heat exchanger models and dual boilers both make excellent foam fast.

Breville Barista BES870XL
Breville Barista Express BES870XL

Semi-Automatic with a latte & shot focus, without a separate grinder

Not too many home espresso machines fit the bill but this Breville does! It has a thermoblock and an integrated burr grinder that saves space and economy of motion. It is a programmable semi-auto so it almost acts like a superautomatic machine and is very easy to use once it is set up.

infuserA thermoblock style, Breville Infuser BES840XL

Semi-Automatic with a latte focus and no grinder

This is where it all started for me — an older Breville model that was a bit smaller than this. It was an easy step into the world of espresso before committing to a costly set-up. Some come with pod adapters, pressurized and non-pressurized portafilter baskets for versatility.

Crossland CC1 + Baratza Preciso
The Crossland CC1 with a Baratza Preciso grinder is a great combo

Semi-automatic with an espresso focus and a good grinder

If your primary focus is quality espresso and you pay attention to tamp, temperature, timing and dosage then find a machine that allows you to control all of these variables. (This PID-controlled machine froths well too.)

Saeco Via Venezia
A small single boiler, Saeco Via Venezia with optional non-pressurized portafilter upgrade (right) and bottomless portafilter upgrade (left)

Semi-Automatic with an espresso focus and no grinder

Plop a pod in the basket and you’ve got what you need to make a ristretto or a lungo how you like it, when you want it. Quick and easy! Just in case you need a touch of frothy milk once in awhile there is a panarello too. A choice in portafilters helps you build espresso skills.

Superautomatic Espresso Machines

So ease of use is paramount for you, but you still want to drink great espresso-based drinks? A superauto may be the machine style for you. To determine which of the many versions available will be the best fit, here are a few more questions for you to consider.

Do you drink milk-based espressos (like lattes, cappuccinos etc)?

Yes, Creamy lattes are what life is all about No, I like espresso and Americanos
Not every superautomatic is great at frothing milk. Many users find that entry-level superautos don’t get the milk froth hot enough. A superauto that also has a steam wand is a nice touch so you can choose whether to use the machine’s auto-frother or its steam wand. Stand alone milk frothers are also a solution. Some superautos do not come with milk frothing capability. If you like espresso and Americanos (and maybe even an occasional Affogato!) this is not a problem. For guests who do like lattes a standalone milk frother is a quick and easy option for frothing milk or making hot chocolate.

Do you need a bypass doser for pre-ground coffee?

Yes, having the option for pre-ground coffee allows me to make a decaf sometimes No, I like fresh whole bean ground coffee for my espresso shots
Some superautos come with a bypass doser. This is a little chute directly to the brew unit so that you can use a different coffee than the beans that are already in the hopper. And that’s ok! if you don’t need the bypass doser that will save you some bucks on technology that you won’t use.

Recommended Superautomatic Machines

After considering the above questions, you should be armed to select which of the below machines speaks to you!

Saeco Xsmall superautomatic espresso machine
Bunny froths milk on a Saeco Xsmall superautomatic espresso machine, or as we like to call it, the Little Dude.

Superautomatic with a latte focus

Your favorite drink features creamy frothy milk, some Monin gourmet syrup and, oh yeah, espresso. If time and counter space are at a premium then a compact superauto can be a great option.

Saeco Exprelia EVO superautomatic espresso machine
Chris in the middle of “making” a one-touch cappuccino on the Saeco Exprelia EVO

Superautomatic with a latte focus and a bypass doser

For you, or for your guests, it’s great to have the option to make a decaf latte once in awhile. The pannarello wand assists by boosting more air into your steam. Or some models have one touch drink-making capability as a fancy feature.

Saeco Minuto superauto
Either/or Teri shows the Saeco Minuto superauto can serve regular coffee or strong espresso at the flip of a lever

Superautomatic with an espresso focus

Grab and go! Like in a true Italian espresso bar where you stand, converse a bit, have a few sips from your demitasse and continue on your way…Some superautos make quick and easy espresso or Americanos. The new Saeco Minuto will drop the pressure to make a single cup of true American-style filter coffee.

Saeco SyntiaPractically hands-free operation…here’s an action shot of the Saeco Syntia (after I made sure the shot glass was placed correctly!)

Superautomatic with an espresso focus and a bypass doser

Bypass doser capability is not always built into superautomatic espresso machines so make sure to verify its availability. The Saeco Syntia has a bypass doser and a pannarello wand making it a very versatile superauto.

Now you have thoughtful criteria to evaluate and select the best home espresso machine to meet your caffeinated (or decaf!) needs. The next step is to research our Learn section with informative articles and YouTube videos, ask questions and read reviews. Will there be a new home espresso machine on your counter in the New Year? There might be on mine!

Brewin’ with Brandi: Espresso Witch Fingers (Shortbread Cookies)

Espresso Witch Fingers (Shortbread Cookies)It’s that time of the year when the ghouls come out to play and there’s probably no better way to keep them in check than by serving up a batch of creepy witch finger-shaped treats, right? Right. Devised especially for your Halloween shindig this year, Brandi’s delicious recipe for espresso-infused shortbread cookies is made all the more spooky and delicious by the addition of a slivered almond ‘fingernail’ at the end of a crooked finger!

The cool thing with this recipe is that you can take it to the dough chilling phase and then have fun creating all manner of ghastly shapes — ghosts, worms, headless horseman … wherever your imagination takes you! And if you happen to have little goblins (AKA small children) hanging around, this recipe is perfect for them to have some fun with, too.

Watch Brandi creep us out while crafting these shortbread cookies. This was seriously the most disturbing video we’ve ever shot, so … enjoy?

Recipe: Espresso Witch Fingers (Shortbread Cookies)

Ingredients

  • 2 sticks of unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • 3/4 teaspoon finely ground coffee
  • 2 1/4 cup flour
  • slivered almonds

Directions

  1. Cream the butter and sugar together until fluffy.
  2. Add vanilla and coffee, then combine until well mixed.
  3. Sift the flour and salt together to incorporate a little bit of air, then add to the butter mixture and beat until well combined.
  4. Chill the dough until firm, about 2 hours.
  5. Once chilled, preheat the oven to 325F.
  6. It’s time to make the fingers! Shape the dough into inch-wide rolls and 4 – 5 inch long pieces.
  7. Place one slivered almond on the end (this is the witch’s fingernail!) and, using the tines of a fork, make a light impression mid-way down the roll (this is the witch’s knuckle!).
  8. Place on a parchment-covered cookie sheet and bake 15 – 20 minutes, or until golden.
  9. Scare the heck out of everyone by serving them up next to a cup of coffee!

Crew Review: Jura Automatic Milk Frother

Jura Automatic Milk FrotherThere are times in your life when you need to stand before a mirror and have a deeply honest moment with yourself. Are you a coffee purist or do you like your java balanced by a little dairy / dairy alternative? If you answer the former, then you may be very tempted to rock all manner of coffee-only equipment that doesn’t bother with any newfangled milk steaming functionality. But then you need to consider: Do you have friends? Do they like their coffee deliciously unaltered? Might you want to offer them a java-infused milk beverage after you serve up the world’s most amazing osso bucco? If your answers to these questions is yes, then picking up a standalone milk frother is highly recommended.

One such model available for your milk frothing and heating needs is the Jura Automatic Milk Frother, which does an excellent job rockin’ hot and cold froth or just straight up warmed milk. Watch as Teri shows us its features and then demonstrates how it performs.

Crew Review: Jura Automatic Milk Frother