Category Archives: Rancilio

How to Program an Auber PID on the Rancilio Silvia

Rancilio Silvia with Auber PIDPerhaps more than any other home espresso machine, the Rancilio Silvia has a devoted, storied following. Originally designed by commercial espresso machine manufacturer Rancilio to give as a gift to their distributors, it quickly took on a life of its own and, for many years, was considered the go-to espresso machine for home enthusiasts who wanted to craft specialty coffee quality drinks.

Owing to its creators, the Silvia featured largely commercial-grade components, which hadn’t really been on offer for many home-class espresso machines before. With copper-plated brass internals, a 58mm standard chrome-plated brass portafilter and a traditional steam wand, it provides the tools you need to make excellent espresso-based drinks. But it does have one major design element that have caused some folks to deem it as ‘finicky.’

The Silvia is a single boiler espresso machine that employs a rather simplistic temperature regulation system — a bi-metal thermostat that engages and disengages the heating element by bending one way or the other (as determined by the machine’s temperature). So, if the machine is on the lower end of the temperature spectrum, a small metal piece will bend one way in order to make a connection and allow the electrical current to reach the element, beginning the heat up process. On the other side of the spectrum, once the machine’s internal temperature reaches a high that causes this thin metal to bend in the opposite direction, it will interrupt the current and the machine will cease heating up. This is a very common method of temperature regulation used in appliances or thermostats around the home, and while it is cheap, reliable and effective, it also lends itself to a wide arc of variable temperature.

When these temperature variables happen in your home, you put on a sweater; when they happen in your espresso machine, they can result in marked differences in shot quality. At the hottest end of the spectrum, your coffee will taste burnt and over extracted, while on the coldest end it will taste sour. One way you can ensure you’re brewing at the right temperature, however, is to ‘temperature surf’ — pull just enough cold water into the boiler to engage the heating element, then, after it’s heated up to its highest temp, wait a bit (to allow the temp to come down from its hottest level) and then brew. Another way you can manage this is to circumvent the bi-metal thermostat altogether and install a PID!

The PID will take over managing the boiler’s temperature by using a more sophisticated and programmable electronic chipset. At SCG, you have the option of ordering a Rancilio Silvia from us that already has an Auber PID installed, which offers the ability to program the boiler temperature and elements of extraction such as pre-infusion and shot timing. In the video below, Gail shows us how to get into the Auber PID unit that we install on the Rancilio Silvia, navigate through it and program it for your specific needs.

Yes, this was a rather extensive and detailed lead-up to a simple how-to video, but knowing is half the battle, friend. And the other half is brought to you by espresso.

SCG How-To Guides: Programming the Auber PID on the Rancilio Silvia

Coffee Grinder Compare: Rancilio KRYO 65 vs. Mazzer Super Jolly

Coffee Grinder ComparisonIf espresso prep is a primary element of your business, then choosing the right coffee grinder for the job is essential. In fact, you may recall us harping on this concept before, but your coffee grinder truly is the most important piece of equipment. The grind is the thing.

To assist in your consideration process, we have produced another grudge match between two fairly similar-grade commercial coffee grinders: New kid on the block, the Rancilio KRYO 65, versus one of the more popular mainstays, the Mazzer Super Jolly.

Watch as Brandon guides us through how they compare, specifications-wise, and then perform a few functional comparisons: Do they produce the same volume of coffee in 5 seconds? Does the KRYO’s aluminum fins make a difference in the grind temperature or consistency? Watch as we put these two mid-range coffee grinders to the test!

Compare: Rancilio KRYO 65 vs. Mazzer Super Jolly Commercial Coffee Grinders

Tech Tip: How to Clean the Rancilio KRYO 65 Commercial Espresso Grinder

Rancilio KRYO 65Designed for high capacity commercial environments, the Rancilio KRYO is an espresso-grade grinder that enables you to craft shot after sumptuous shot. With its 64mm stainless steel burrs, dosing chamber and unique aluminum fins (that dissipate the grind temperature) it quickly grinds up coffee for your double shots. But one key element of consistent shot flavor is to ensure that you’re using fresh coffee, and not inadvertently melding flavors with a built-up melange of old coffee grounds.

To avoid that, we highly recommend that you clean the grinder on a regular basis — at least monthly, if not weekly. Getting into it, taking it apart and then getting it back together again can seem a bit overwhelming, however, so we’ve filmed a how-to video for you! Hopefully, watching it will give you the confidence you need to take this project on.

Watch as Brandon walks us through the whole process, gives us tips on best practice and even tutors us in the ways of knowing when it’s time to replace the burrs. Even if you don’t want to dive into the full cleaning every week, doing it each month will improve your coffee flavor, and your customers will definitely dig it!

Tech Tip: How to Clean the Rancilio Kryo Commercial Espresso Grinder

 

Rebuilding the Rancilio C-Lever Steam Arm Assemblies

Rancilio C-Lever TechnologyIf you’re running a fast-paced coffee business, slinging a high volume of milk-infused espresso drinks throughout the day, you’ll be giving your commercial espresso machine’s steam wands a serious workout. This results in some degradation of a few of its internal parts, which will require replacement in order to maintain full steam functionality.

But performing this regular maintenance doesn’t have to mean a tech call if you know your way around your machine’s steam arm assembly. In fact, since performing this maintenance can be required sometimes as often as every 6 months, learning how to do it yourself will save you money, in addition to extending the life and performance of your machine. Sure, it sounds a bit daunting, but we’re here to help!

The first demonstration we have for you is on the Rancilio series of commercial espresso machines that feature their C-Lever functionality. We asked our commercial expert, Brandon, to guide us through how to remove, disassemble, replace parts, reassemble and then reinstall the steam arm on the Rancilio Classe 9, but this process applies to the majority of their machines. If you’re starting to notice water or steam leaking from the wand when it’s in its ‘off’ position, this is a hallmark sign that it’s time to perform this maintenance. So watch this video and then dive in!

SCG How-To Guide: Rebuilding Rancilio C-Lever Steam Arm Assembly

The Reluctant Barista Dials in a Coffee Grinder on the Last Frontier

IMG_1796Lots of Seattle Coffee Gear fans watch our YouTube videos to learn more about coffee and espresso with our hands-on tutorials. But what if you don’t have internet or wireless service available? This summer, I carefully hand-carried a Rancilio Rocky Coffee Grinder to Homer, Alaska, a location often highlighted as part of the current ‘Alaskan Reality TV Show’ craze. Let me tell you about the reality I faced as I tried to help my family dial in their new coffee grinder without the SCG Crew there to help me.

First of all, my family lives on twenty acres located ten miles outside of town. Fair to say, it is a little remote. Tom Bodett calls Homer The End of the Road: Electricity is a new arrival at the house and my mom still cooks on a wood stove. Internet comes via satellite service, which is comparable to the dial-up systems of yore in terms of both speed and reliability. My step-dad unpacked this nice hand-built Italian grinder on the coffee table and fished around inside the box for instructions. I laughed a little at the old-fashioned notion of reading a user manual and pulled out my smartphone. The joke was on me when I had no cell reception and such limited wi-fi that I could navigate to YouTube, but not play a video! Then, the joke was on him because the poorly translated Italian-to-English instructions left us scratching our heads.

I love the Rancilio Rocky grinder. It is a home grinder, but it’s made with commercial parts, so I knew it would be the right grinder to reliably produce the daily espresso needed to make my folks an Americano and a cappuccino. I reached deep into my memory bank to help set up this burr grinder. The one thing I clearly recalled was to make sure beans are ground through it as the burrs are adjusted lower so they do not grind against each other and cause damage. I wish I had seen Teri’s excellent video on how to dial in a Rocky before I left Seattle. We did find a written blog post by Kat years ago and used it to guide our efforts.

The part that frustrated me most about dialing in the new grinder was not the physical adjustment, but rather the amount of espresso beans used and time it took. Compared to the Baratza Virtuoso I have at home in Seattle, the process was night and day. By the time I ran through the recommended ¼ pound of beans on the Baratza I found my grind. With the Rocky, it took a full bag of beans plus the stopwatch app on my phone and multiple taste tests that left us all wired. The Rancilio instructions say that this process will never need to be repeated but I know from watching Kat and Gail’s videos that any time you get new beans or a new machine, re-calibration is required.

The Rancilio Rocky grinder is an excellent coffee grinder and the fuss of a more temperamental set up is rewarded with an ideal home espresso grind. My parents wanted a grinder that could be carefully maintained and serviced to last many years. In the greater scheme of things, an evening spent hopped-up on espresso shots was family bonding time and not actually wasted. Plus each morning thereafter was like Christmas as we raced to see who would get to use the new grinder first.

What is the takeaway from this cautionary tale? A) Don’t count on modern technology to work in the wilderness B) Be more patient than I am C) We put a great effort into creating the perfect home espresso station while there’s still no thought of indoor plumbing. And that is the reality of life on the Last Frontier.

homer

 

Crew Tip: Rancilio Rocky Doserless Adjustment

Rancilio Rocky GrinderIf you own a Rancilio Rocky doserless coffee grinder, you sometimes might wish you were blessed with as many arms as Blinky is with eyes … how else do you hold down the adjustment lever, turn the hopper and then also run the grinder when you’re making the grind more fine?

First off, let’s cover why you should do this. Whenever you’re adjusting a burr grinder to a finer setting, you’re essentially bringing the burrs closer together. If you do that without running the grinder at the same time, you run the risk of compacting coffee beans in the grind chute and even warping or permanently damaging the threads. This is such a costly repair, it really means that you’re looking for a replacement grinder.

To avoid such horror, you need to run the grinder as you bring the burrs closer together. On the Rocky model that includes a doser chamber, this is easier, as you have an on / off button to use. The Rocky without a doser, however, simply has a rocker switch that must always be engaged in order to grind. So how do you manage all three at once? Watch Teri as she demonstrates her trick for adjusting the Rocky doserless more finely when you’ve only got your own hands to spare!

SCG Crew Tip: Rancilio Rocky Doserless Adjustment

Crew Review: Rancilio KRYO 65 Commercial Burr Espresso Grinder

Rancilio KRYO 65Can’t sacrifice quality for quantity or vice versa? The Rancilio KRYO 65 feels your pain and was designed specifically to alleviate it.

Featuring 64mm stainless steel burrs, an aluminum fin collar to dissipate heat more evenly and a simple worm-drive adjustment mechanism, the KRYO 65 is built for high capacity coffee shops that need to produce consistent, excellent espresso. It also features a doser chamber for you to grind and dose quickly during a particularly mad rush, which also has the virtue of keeping things (relatively) clean.

If your cafe’s pace means you need to craft a quality espresso-based drink each minute, the KRYO 65’s speedy delivery (14 grams in about 4 seconds) will get you where you need to go. Watch as Brandon shows us its tech specs and features, including an internal tour of the burrs and grind shaft, plus a demonstration of of its grind quality.

Crew Review: Rancilio KRYO 65 Commercial Burr Espresso Grinder

Rancilio Classe 9 Automatic: Programming Guide

Rancilio Classe 9 AutomaticSometimes you find yourself in the middle of a little bit too much technology and you need a helping hand to guide you to the other side. If the Rancilio Classe 9 Automatic commercial espresso machine is that for you, then Brandon is your tech sherpa who will happily pilot you through its menus and programming functionality.

In this comprehensive how-to video, you’ll learn all about the Rancilio Classe 9 Automatic’s internal menu and programming, including tips on how to best dial in your volumetric dosing.

SCG How-To Guide: Programming the Rancilio Classe 9 Automatic Commercial Espresso Machine

Rancilio Classe 9: Crew Review & Internal Tour

Rancilio Classe 9The Rancilio Classe 9 Automatic espresso machine is a model that some folks consider may be too much machine for their business. There are so many styles available, how do you know which manufacturer, let alone model, to go with?

When selecting a commercial espresso machine for your business, there are a few things you should think about: How many espresso-based drinks do you think you’ll make during your busiest hour? What style of drinks do you want to prepare — straight espresso, milk-infused concoctions or something altogether different like a Rooibos tea latte? What level of training and staff turnover might you expect in your business? Finally, how quickly will you see the return on your investment at different espresso machine prices?

Once you’ve determined the answers to those questions, it’s much easier to select the right machine that will keep up with your business’ pace, perform well under market demands and produce the type of drinks that are popular in your area or that you specialize in.

If your business happens to be high volume and particularly fast paced, the Rancilio Classe 9 Automatic espresso machine is definitely worth considering. It features some great automation, such as volumetric dosing, that can make it easier for your staff to quickly produce consistent espresso shots and its impressive boiler design makes short work of even the largest steaming pitcher. You can also select a model that allows for more room beneath the portafilter spouts, designed for extracting directly into tall to-go cups. This is the machine of choice for popular drive-through espresso stands that need to quickly serve up quality drinks during a serious morning rush.

Want to learn more about the Rancilio Classe 9? In these videos, we take you through a standard feature and specification review, then we guide you through an internal tour so you can see how everything works from the inside out. If you have any other questions on the Classe 9 or think it might be the right fit for your business, please feel free to contact us — we’d love to help!

Crew Review: Rancilio Classe 9 Automatic Commercial Espresso Machine

Internal Tour of the Rancilio Classe 9 Automatic Commercial Espresso Machine

SCG How-To Guides: Packing Your Espresso Machine for Shipping

Packing an Espresso Machine for ShippingDoes your Saeco Via Venezia need to be repaired but you don’t have a repair center in your area? Did you try on a DeLonghi Magnifica for size and it didn’t quite fit? Will that Rocket Espresso R58 see more action at your vacation home? Regardless of your reason for shipping your espresso machine — repair, return or simple transit — ensuring that it’s packed properly to limit damage is key.

In this series of videos, we asked a member of our shipping crew, Spencer, to guide us through the best practices for three general styles of espresso machines: Small (under 35lbs), large (over 35lbs) and superautomatics (watch those drip trays!). Check out the video that most closely matches your style of machine to learn how the pros do it.

Episode One: Packing a Small (Under 35lbs) Espresso Machine

Episode Two: Packing a Large (Over 35lbs) Espresso Machine

Episode Three: Packing a Superautomatic Espresso Machine