Category Archives: Nuova Simonelli

Tech Tip: How to Clean the Nuova Simonelli MDX Coffee Grinder

Nuova Simonelli MDXCaring for your Nuova Simonelli MDX is an essential element of producing excellent espresso, and it’s easier than you think! The MDX features a burr configuration that adjusts the bottom burr instead of the top during calibration, so cleaning it doesn’t mean you’ll need to completely dial in your grinder again. It also has a super simple method for removing the front doser chamber for cleaning, so you can also keep this area in tip-top condition.

In addition to regularly running a product like Grindz through it, you should completely disassemble, clean and then reassemble the Nuova Simonelli MDX every so often to ensure optimal performance. The frequency of this is dictated a bit by how busy your cafe is — many businesses do this weekly, while others do it monthly. You’ll know which is the best schedule for your coffee shop once you start doing it regularly and can gauge how much coffee is building up in the burr chamber.

Recommended tools include a vacuum of some sort and a firm-bristled brush, like the Grindminder; other than that, a little soap and water for the bean hopper and doser chamber keeps everything squeaky clean. For guidance on this procedure and tips on how to care for the grinder once you’ve taken it apart, watch Brandon’s in depth video.

Tech Tip: How to Clean the Nuova Simonelli MDX Coffee Grinder

Crew Review: Nuova Simonelli MDX Grinder

Nuova Simonelli MDXWhen we first met the Nuova Simonelli MDX a few years ago, it seemed to fall into the same class as other similarly sized commercial-grade grinders did: It ground coffee quickly, uniformly and easily, so that you could extract a shot of espresso in under a minute from start to finish. But as we got to know it a bit better, we found that some its unique features made it a particularly learned choice for coffee connoisseurs and crafters alike.

First, unlike other grinders that keep the bottom burr stationary and move the top burr up and down during calibration, the Nuova Simonelli MDX does the opposite. The top burr remains stationary while the bottom adjusts up and down during calibration. This means that when you remove the top burr during cleaning, you don’t lose your grind setting and post-cleaning dial-in is a snap.

Next, the adjustment mechanism on the MDX is pretty tight: A smooth moving knob on top of the grinder versus a sometimes-jerky adjustment collar. It’s super simple to dial in the grind using the knob, leaving very little guesswork around where your grind setting is.

Other than that, though, it’s a fairly standard mid-sized commercial grinder — removable bean hopper, stainless steel flat burrs with a ~1100lb. bean lifetime, front doser chamber to capture ground coffee on the fly. In Brandon’s crew review video, he goes over all the Nuova Simonelli MDX’s features and specs, then demonstrates its grind consistency and performance.

Crew Review: Nuova Simonelli MDX Coffee Grinder

SCG How-To Guides: Packing Your Espresso Machine for Shipping

Packing an Espresso Machine for ShippingDoes your Saeco Via Venezia need to be repaired but you don’t have a repair center in your area? Did you try on a DeLonghi Magnifica for size and it didn’t quite fit? Will that Rocket Espresso R58 see more action at your vacation home? Regardless of your reason for shipping your espresso machine — repair, return or simple transit — ensuring that it’s packed properly to limit damage is key.

In this series of videos, we asked a member of our shipping crew, Spencer, to guide us through the best practices for three general styles of espresso machines: Small (under 35lbs), large (over 35lbs) and superautomatics (watch those drip trays!). Check out the video that most closely matches your style of machine to learn how the pros do it.

Episode One: Packing a Small (Under 35lbs) Espresso Machine

Episode Two: Packing a Large (Over 35lbs) Espresso Machine

Episode Three: Packing a Superautomatic Espresso Machine

Tech Tip: How to Clean the Nuova Simonelli MCI & Grinta Coffee Grinders

It’s time to dive into the care and maintenance of a couple of the Nuova Simonelli grinders that we carry. While you’re probably running Grindz through your grinder on a regular basis, this is great maintenance to perform at least a couple of times per year.

Nuova Simonelli MCIFirst, we take on the MCI. This grinder is so fabulous because it delivers high quality, commercial-grade grinding functionality in a super petite package — perfect for home espresso setups where space might be an issue. You can pair it with our prosumer level espresso machines and dial it in finitely, producing rich and delicious espresso.

One of the coolest things about this particular grinder is that, like its larger commercial-grade counterparts, the burr adjustment is managed by moving the lower burr up and down. What does that mean for you? Well, unlike a Mazzer or a Compak, you won’t lose your grind calibration when you take apart the burrs for cleaning — righteous, no? Watch as Gail shows us how to take apart the MCI and then guides us through best practice in terms of regular cleaning and maintenance.

Nuova Simonelli GrintaNext, we get into the Grinta. One of the more popular home grinders that we carry, the Grinta provides you with excellent grind functionality and simple features for a great price. One trick when cleaning it, however, is that the top burr is attached to the adjustment collar and the hopper, so you need to take care with removing a few extra screws in order to clean the hopper without risking unwanted moisture on your burrs. And, unlike the MCI, the Grinta will lose its calibration as you unscrew the top burr, so you will need to dial it again once it’s been sufficiently cleaned.

Check out the process of taking it apart, cleaning it and putting it back together again in this how-to video.

SCG Customer Field Trip: Cederberg Tea House – Parts 1 & 2

Cederberg Tea House - SeattleOne of the coolest things we do here at SCG is help others get the equipment they need to start the businesses of their dreams. Recently, we headed out on a field trip to the labor of love of mother and daughter team Natasha and Cecile: The Cederberg Tea House, located in the heart of Seattle’s Queen Anne neighborhood. With a unique rooibos tea latte preparation and delicious treats, these gals are focused on bringing a little bit of South African culture to damp Seattle.

Before they were fully open, we wanted to learn more about their experiences with starting their new business. What did they enjoy the most? What was the most difficult part of it? What do they know now that they wish they knew when they started out? Hear their story and watch Natasha craft us a delicious rooibos tea latte using a Nuova Simonelli Appia espresso machine.


Part One: Natasha and Cecile share their startup experiences


Part Two: Natasha makes us a rooibos tea latte

The Reluctant Barista: A Tale of Three Rockets

cellini classicRocket Espresso makes highly polished stainless steel home espresso machines in Milan, Italy. And we really mean highly polished: You can actually see your reflection in their gleaming surfaces. We have a row of Rocket demo models standing at the ready in our store, which can sometimes give the visual affect of a row of funhouse mirrors.

My go-to Rocket machine is the Giotto Evoluzione, which sits next to the R58 Dual Boiler and the Cellini Premium Plus. While I’m often found crafting one of my favorite drinks on the Giotto Evo (a Shot in the Dark), I also occasionally experiment with the other models — like firing up the R58 just to watch an espresso extraction with a bottomless portafilter (yes, that’s what we do for fun around here). But I hadn’t played much with Rocket’s entry-level model, the Cellini Classic, so decided to find out how it stacked up against my other favorites.

First, a little background: The only difference between the Cellini series and the Giotto series is their case styles. The Cellini has straight sides and the Giotto has more angled, diamond-shaped sides. In accordance with its name, the Classic has a straight design like the other Cellinis, however the sides are brushed stainless steel and the top and front panels remain polished. Next, ‘Premium Plus’ refers to models with an internal water reservoir only, while ‘Evoluzione’ refers to models that have a convertible water source — either the internal reservoir or plumbed to the main water supply. The Classic has an internal reservoir only and a few less features than the other models overall, but still sports the well-loved E61 brew group of its compatriots.

So I wondered, would I notice if a few Rocket Espresso features were left off? I gave the machine a chance to warm up and then I made Dori a latte. While the functionality was similar to the other Rocket models, the feel was different. The machine felt stiffer to use and the knobs were more plastic-y. Yes, I know espresso knobs are generally made of plastic, but this felt more plastic than usual, with sharper edges and none of the tactile luxury associated with other Rocket models. Looks aside, I felt like the performance was on par — my shots were great! The Classic operated very intuitively on my first and subsequent attempts, and I did not miss having a PID nor did I mind that I had only a single manometer instead of two gauges. When things go so smoothly right out of the gate, I don’t feel the need to fuss or fine tune.

For the price, I still prefer the slightly smaller stature and slightly larger boiler of the Nuova Simonelli Oscar, another heat exchanger model. Even though the Oscar case is all-plastic, oddly enough, it does not seem plastic-y (at least not to me). It is interesting how we each have our own notions about the look and feel of espresso machines! The taste of the espresso produced is usually the main qualifier, but price, quality — and yes, even looks — all play a part in the decision.  The Cellini Classic will perform like a Rocket and that’s what counts, right? And you can always sink the savings into a high quality burr grinder, like the Rocket Mazzer  (for a sweet countertop set-up).

Crew Review: Nuova Simonelli Appia Semi-Automatic Commercial Espresso Machine

Nuova Simonelli AppiaAnother commercial-class espresso machine that will perform well in a medium-paced business is the Appia by Nuova Simonelli. Available in both semi-automatic and automatic/volumetric formats, the Appia is simple and straight forward and certain to keep up with you.

Watch as Brandon takes us on a tour of the semi-auto version, going over its features and specs and then demonstrating how well it performs.

Nuova Simonelli Aurelia II Volumetric: Review, Internal Tour, Care and Maintenance

Nuova Simonelli Aurelia II VolumetricAn incredibly popular machine for high production cafes, the Aurelia II Volumetric by Nuova Simonelli is built to keep up with long lines of latte-lovin’ customers. In this series of videos, our commercial sales manager, Brandon, guides us through everything from a straight-up functional and spec review to a detailed internal tour of the machine to best practice around maintenance and care. If you’re in the market for a machine for your business, the Aurelia II is definitely worth your consideration, and these videos lay down the groundwork for your research.

If you have more questions about these videos or need some guidance regarding the right equipment for your business, drop us a line!

 


Crew Review: Nuova Simonelli Aurelia II Volumetric


Internal Tour of the Nuova Simonelli Aurelia II Volumetric Espresso Machine


Nuova Simonelli Aurelia II Volumetric Care & Maintenance

SCG Crew’s Favorite Gear: Single, Hx and Dual Boiler Espresso Machines

Next in our series of the crew’s favorite picks covers the world of traditional espresso machines. Find out which single, heat exchange and double boiler machines the team digs.


Single Boiler Espresso Machines


Heat Exchange Espresso Machines


Dual Boiler Espresso Machines

Face Off: Musica vs. Giotto Evoluzione

Decided to up your latte game and invite a ‘prosumer’ espresso machine into your home? I was interested in learning more about two of the the heat exchangers that we have in the store — the art deco inspired Nuova Simonelli Musica and the hand crafted Rocket Giotto Evoluzione — so I decided to take them each for a test drive. Now, if you’re into straight up features and spec comparisons, check out the table I’ve laid out below; but if you learn more from hands-on experiences, read on!

I started with the Musica and instantly fell in love with its portafilter. The smartly angled handle enables the filter basket to lie flat on the counter. Jessica held my hand as I dialed in the grind using the Mazzer Mini E – Type A grinder. After pulling a number of double shots, I came to appreciate the Musica’s automatic pre-infusion and programmable volumetric buttons, making this machine a breeze once you figure out the right grind and tamp for your bean. You can also steam milk extremely quickly using the standard three hole steam tip. I loved the paddle functionality to control the steam, allowing you to pulse or flip up for maximum power.

As I approached the Rocket, I could see my reflection in its highly polished casing. With a commercial-grade brew head, I was in store for consistent shots given the thermal stability provided by the E61. After inserting the portafilter, I flipped up the lever all the way to begin shot extraction. I was glued to a timer while pulling shots, and this would be best practice given there isn’t volumetric programming on this machine. Steaming was straightforward with a traditional steam knob and single hole tip, giving me a little more time to work up the microfoam.

In the end, there was no difference in shot or milk quality from these two exceptional machines, so it all boils down to a few essentials in your decision set. If you need a convertible water source, crave sleek steel lines and appreciate the ritual of classic espresso extraction, the Giotto Evo is a strong bet. If you need an NSF rated machine for a small cafe environment or dig  modern conveniences like programmable volumetrics and disco lights, give the Musica a happy home.

nuova_simonelli_musica_-_black_lining_3
Nuova Simonelli Musica
giotto-evo_1
Rocket Giotto Evoluzione
Dimensions 12.75 in W x 16 in D x 16.75 in 12 in W x 17 in D x 15 in (16.5 in w/ cup rails)
Reservoir Size 2.3 Liters 2.9 Liters
Water Source Either reservoir or direct connect Convertible
Programmability Volumetric control None
Case Design Stainless steel with optional disco lights Stainless steel and fancy like a race car
Steam Wand Traditional, not insulated, 3 hole tip Traditional, insulated, 2 hole tip
Boiler Material Copper Copper
Pre-infusion Automatic and programmable Passive
Boiler Volume 2 Liter 1.8 Liter
NSF rated Yes No
Pump Vibratory Rotary
Gauges Boiler pressure Steam boiler & brew head pressure