Compare: Airscape vs. Coffee Bean Vac

In the world of coffee bean storage, do either of these devices do a better job of keeping your beans fresher, longer? We asked Gail to throw a bag of Velton’s Bonsai Blend into an Airscape and a Coffee Bean Vac, then we pulled shots a week later and two weeks later to see how they held up. Aside from when we opened them for testing, they were securely sealed.

Watch to find out how they stack up!

4 comments for “Compare: Airscape vs. Coffee Bean Vac

  1. March 3, 2012 at 9:04 am

    I think you missed an opportunity to compare these relatively expensive and cumbersome canisters to the simple technique of placing the coffee bean bag in a small zip-lock sandwich bag, squeezing the air out, and zipping the bag closed.

    • Kat
      March 5, 2012 at 8:46 am

      Nope! The test was explicitly a comparison of these two storage containers, not one of coffee storage in general (a topic on which we have tested considerably in the past).

      - Kat

  2. William
    March 5, 2012 at 1:39 am

    Interesting that there wasn’t much difference between a vacuum and non-vacuum container. I’m curious how these would stack up against some of the more common storage methods:

    - plastic or foil lined coffee bag, tightly closed
    - ziplock or similar airtight bag
    - airtight jar
    - typical grinder hopper

    Thanks again for the great videos!

    • Kat
      March 5, 2012 at 8:53 am

      The Airscape does seal the beans, it’s just a manual method vs. a battery operated method. It has a one way valve that expresses all air out when you put the black lid on, having a similar affect as the Bean Vac’s suction contraption. (!)

      We have done a bunch of different aging tests, including storing in the freezer in different methods, etc. As soon as the coffee is exposed to oxygen, it’s going to degrade, so any storage method should keep that in mind. As well as the ideal of using the coffee you open within a week’s time. Keeping them sealed in anything until just before use is your best bet; hoppers are not airtight at all and offer too much exposure to light, so really shouldn’t be the main storage for beans — putting in there what you’re about to use is a good idea, but, in the end, it really depends on your personal palate’s sensitivity to subtle changes like that. :)

      - Kat

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


8 × five =